Are you ready to declare your independence from overeating?

Many of us are tired of being full. We are tired of harsh self-criticism, dissatisfaction with our bodies, and skepticism that we will ever be able to overcome our tendency to overeat and the powerlessness that we feel over food. You can learn the skills you need to end overeating and love yourself to better health. And it all starts with a daily practice of awareness and self-kindness.

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Changing the Conversation…

From a quick check of the mainstream medical literature, the “War on Obesity” appears to be in full swing. The alarm is audible everywhere, at our medical conferences, in our offices and hospitals, from government leaders, within our schools, and for many of us, within our own households. We, as health care providers, are trained to believe that fat is the enemy, and that, beyond a certain BMI, we must recommend weight loss (or at least maintenance of a stable weight during periods of growth) in order to promote health. Our training is so focused on outcomes (e.g. weight and BMI) as indicators of health, that we actually feel progressive when we focus on “healthy lifestyle choices,” rather than on simply eradicating fat through weight loss.

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Perfectionism and People Pleasing -- The reasons we procrastinate are often rooted in our strengths

One of my favorite parts of my job is helping my clients to improve their time management, so that they can carve out more time for pleasure and being truly present in their lives. To improve performance in any area, time management included, we need to acknowledge and understand the obstacles. Despite considering myself to be a relatively accomplished person, I have struggled as mightily with time management as I have with food. Time management is now an ongoing area of personal development work for me. I have studied it and have incorporated what I have learned into my own daily practice (and it is a practice, rather than a destination). All of this is to say that, thanks to my own shortcomings in this area, I have a pretty clear understanding of the obstacles involved.

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Lessons from a turkey sandwich!

At my most comfortable, natural weight, I knew what I was having for lunch every day.
 
It was my third year in medical school, commonly believed to be the most stressful, but I tend to gain weight when I am stressed, so that was not the reason. And it was also not what I was eating that brought me to this comfortable, sane place with food and my body. It was how.
 

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“You become what you think about…”

My favorite quote from the business literature is, “You become what you think about most of the time.”[1] Focus on what you don’t like or don’t want in your life (fat, dieting, food rules, your least favorite body part (more on this later), your worst habit), and that’s exactly what you are likely to get more of. Have you ever noticed how the more you focus on restricting calories or avoiding certain foods, the more you want to consume? You get what you think about.

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Book Release: Helping Patients Outsmart Overeating: Psychological Strategies for Doctors and Health Care Providers and Discount Code!

I am delighted to report that my new book, Helping Patients Outsmart Overeating: Psychological Strategies for Doctors and Health Care Providers, was released this week. The book is co-authored with eating disorders therapist, 7-book author, and eating psychology expert Karen R. Koenig, LCSW, M.Ed. Eating psychology is about the “how” and “why” of eating, rather than the “what,” and it helps us to understand the patterns of thought, emotion and belief that cause some of us to restrict calories, overeat, or alternate between dietary deprivation and mindless over-consumption. It is these patterns that often underlie what we ultimately recognize as weight gain, weight struggles and metabolic dysfunction. Understanding and addressing these patterns is an important step in healing overeating, chronic dieting, and weight cycling, and Helping Patients Outsmart Overeating seeks to help doctors, health care professionals and patients do exactly that.

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Ask a Great Question – Post #1

This series of blog posts, entitled, “Ask A Great Question,” is intended to help you approach challenges, problems, and goals differently than you may have in the past. When you ask a great question, you approach the topic from a different perspective, often one that you have not considered before.

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Zucchini "Pasta" - Fun Food for Fun People

Zucchini “pasta” is a wonderful way to incorporate more fruits and vegetables into your diet, while also enjoying the warm, savory flavors that most of us associate with comfort food. Zucchini is rich in vitamin C, manganese, vitamin B-6 and vitamin K.[1] Creating this dish from zucchini rather than wheat or white pasta (or rice) helps boost both the flavor and the nutrient-density, while allowing you to have lunch or dinner on the table faster than it would take you to boil the water for pasta.

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Childhood Casualties of the “War on Obesity:” A CALL TO ACTION for Health Care Providers

The problem with our “war on obesity” is that, as in all wars, there are unintended casualties for our children. When we tell children that the fat on their bodies will kill them, or that their bodies are unacceptable if they do not conform to the cultural thin ideal, or the bell-shaped curve of “acceptable” weight or BMI values, they internalize these judgments as shame, whether they recognize it in the moment or not.

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Paige O'Mahoney
A Habit worth breaking: Self-criticism/judging yourself harshly.

Have you ever noticed or been told that you are our own worst critic? Do you criticize yourself for your perceived shortcomings, imperfections, and mistakes? Do you live in fear of taking risks in your career and big steps in your life because you worry about being judged harshly by yourself or others if things do not go perfectly? If so, you are not alone. Many high-achievers are hard on themselves. Some even believe that this perfectionism and “accountability” is part of what drives them to succeed.

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